Album Review: Gerry Cinnamon – Erratic Cinematic


The Glasgow singer-songwriter’s debut effort is worth the wait

NOT one for conformity, Gerry Cinnamon took his time producing his first album after years of writing, touring and blowing away festival crowds.

The proud Castlemilk boy has a history of rejecting the music industry, see first single ‘Kampfire Vampire’, but now with the
release of Erratic Cinematic he is very much in its throng.


Despite winning Best Live Act at the 2016 Scottish Alternative Music Awards, packing out tents at T in the Park and bagging support slots for the likes of Ocean Colour Scene – Cinnamon
remains a maverick.

His maiden record is aptly titled. Cinnamon is erratic but, frankly, it is part of his charm.

Its opening gambit ‘Sometimes’ will be familiar to his hardcore fans, and, due to Cinnamon’s prominence in the Glasgow scene of late, the casual listener.

Positively uplifting and full of hope, upon first listen it
emboldens the soul. Cinnamon loops a drum beat and layers up simple riffs effectively while churning out a reminiscent tone telling tales of a Glasgwegian youth.


Gerry Cinnamon released his debut album Erratic Cinematic on September 27.

You have not experienced toe-tapping until you find yourself locked into ‘Lullaby’.

Much like Paolo Nutini’s ‘Iron Sky’ it opens with a rousing speech sample from Sidney Lumet’s The Network (1976) that sets the tone for a rousing anthem.

Cinnamon plucks away like a seasoned bluegrass musician and chants calls for comfort “sing me to sleep, sing me a love song, sing me a lullaby from days gone by.”

Things slow down with ‘What Have You Done’ as Cinnamon
displays the breadth of his musicality with heart-wrenching blows on the harmonica throughout.


“Long-awaited and impossible to fault, Gerry Cinnamon has delivered the Glesga goods with Erratic Cinematic. His combination of charm, wit and politics appeals not only to the every man but every man. A triumph.”


‘Belter’ features snippets of crowd chants for Cinnamon and is as raw and authentic as any love song you could wish to hear – a serenade for the West of Scotland.

The singer-songwriter continues to swoon and introspect on
‘Fortune Favours the Bold’ before the album’s title track kicks up the dust again with a saloon-door swinging whistle and intricate guitar.

‘Keysies’ is short but sweet. Stripped back and bare, it is 90
seconds of carefree childhood memories long gone and pined after.

Of the nine tracks, ‘Diamonds in the Mud’ is the highlight.
Cinnamon is joined by some percussion in the form of drums to take on Glasgow’s charm and class divide. It has the makings of a true working class anthem.

Clocking in at just 31 minutes Erratic Cinematic closes with ‘War TV’ featuring a sample from a ’70s Doctor Who episode and a clip of former Prime Minister David Cameron as Cinnamon
denounces global conflict.

Long-awaited and impossible to fault, Gerry Cinnamon has
delivered the Glesga goods with Erratic Cinematic. His
combination of charm, wit and politics appeals not only to the every man but every man. A triumph.

5/5

Gerry Cinnamon launches Erratic Cinematic St Luke’s, Glasgow on September 28. This event is sold-out.

The album is available on Amazon, Spotify, iTunes (inc. Apple Music) with a physical run soon to be released.

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